About Our Accreditation

The American College of Radiology (ACR) is the gold standard among providers and patients. ACR accreditation is so highly regarded, more than 90% of accredited facilities are associated with ACR. Our CT scanning department has been accredited with ACR since March 15, 2010.

American College of Radiology Seal of Accredidation

CT Scans

Your oncologist may refer you to a local facility for a CT scan. CT stands for “Computerized Tomography.” It’s sometimes referred to by its longer name, “Computerized Axial Tomography” or CAT scan.

This non-invasive procedure involves taking X-rays of your body from various angles, usually after you have ingested a contrasting agent such as iodine-based dye or a barium solution. The results are used to generate a tomogram, a three-dimensional cross-sectional image of your body. This helps physicians pinpoint the location of a tumor, diagnose muscle and bone disorders, determine where to extract a biopsy, and monitor the success of your treatment.

YOUR SAFETY

Using ASIR software, our low dose CT scanner is able to produce higher quality images while using up to 40% less radiation than other scanners in the region. At Hematology Oncology Associates, you get the best of both worlds—the minimum amount of radiation and the best possible diagnostics.

WHAT YOU CAN EXPECT

A CT scan can last from 30 minutes to as much as an hour. During the scan, you will lie on a table inside the doughnut-shaped gantry while an X-ray tube rotates around your body. As X-rays pass through your body at different angles, the amount of radiation reflected varies according to the kinds of tissues. The computer then assembles these images and displays the resulting tomogram on a computer monitor. Following the exam, a radiologist will interpret the images and submit a report to your doctor.

A low-carbohydrate, high-protein diet is recommended the day prior to your CT scan. If you are taking a contrast medium, our technologist may also give you special instructions. People with asthma, allergies, diabetes, heart disease, kidney problems, or certain thyroid conditions have a small risk of reaction to the contrast medium. Pregnant women are advised to consider alternative diagnostic tests such as ultrasound. Please inform your physician if you have any of these conditions.